Fire Department Of Bellevue-Dayton

U.S. Civilian Fire Fatalities & Injuries Data

Statistical Reports on the U.S. Fire Problem

The U.S. Fire Administration (USFA) has released its latest statistical reports that explore aspects of the U.S. fire problem that affect Americans in their daily lives.   The reports, primarily based on data collected through USFA’s National Fire Incident Reporting System (NFIRS), briefly address the nature and relevance of the specific fire or fire-related problem, highlight important findings, and suggest other resources to consider for further information.

Residential fires account for the vast majority of civilian casualties.  National estimates for 2010-2012 show that 82 percent of all fire deaths and 78 percent of all fire injuries occurred in residential buildings.   The findings from two reports, “Civilian Fire Fatalities in Residential Buildings (2000-2012)” and “Civilian Fire Injuries in Residential Buildings (2010–2012)” reveal that:

Civilian Fire Fatalities in Residential Buildings (findings)

  • Bedrooms, at 51 percent, were the leading specific location where civilian fire fatalities occurred in residential buildings.
  • The time period from 11 p.m. to 7 a.m. accounted for 52 percent of civilian fire fatalities in residential buildings.  This period also accounted for 49 percent of fatal fires in residential buildings.
  • At the time of their deaths, 37 percent of fire victims in residential buildings were trying to escape; an additional 33 percent were sleeping.
  • “Other unintentional, careless” actions (15 percent) and “smoking” (15 percent) were the leading reported causes of fatal fires in residential buildings.
  • Males accounted for 57 percent of civilian fire fatalities in residential buildings; females accounted for 43 percent of the fatalities.

Civilian Fire Injuries in Residential Buildings (findings)

  • Civilian fire injuries that occurred in residential buildings accounted for 78 percent of all fire injuries.
  • Residential building fires resulting in injuries occurred most frequently in the late afternoon and early evening hours.
  • The month of January, at 10 percent, had the highest incidence of residential building fires resulting in injuries.
  • Cooking, by far, was the leading reported cause for residential building fires that resulted in injuries.
  • Of the civilian fire injuries that occurred in residential buildings, 35 percent resulted from trying to control a fire; an additional 26 percent occurred while the victim was attempting to escape.

To view the full reports, visit the U.S. Fire Administration at Fema.gov, or click below:

“Civilian Fire Fatalities in Residential Buildings (2010–2012)” August 2014

“Civilian Fire Injuries in Residential Buildings (2010–2012)” October 2014